Kawasaki Syndrome

Last Updated: 2019-08-26

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  • Kawasaki 1967
  • Morbus Kawasaki, Mukokutanes Lymphknoten-Syndrom, akutes febriles mukokutanes Lymphadenopathiesyndrom
  • Infection-associated diffuse vasculitis, which mainly occurs in children.  
  • Höchste Inzidenz besteht in Asien
  • Häufigste Vaskulitis im Kindesalter
  • 80 % der Patienten sind 1-5 Jahre alt
  • In the course of an infection, a cell-mediated reaction occurs against endothelial antigens of the blood vessels (preferably the medium and large arteries).
  1. High fever
  2. Cervical Lymphadenopathy
  3. Conjunctival participation with photophobia
  4. Palmar- und Plantarerythem
  5. Skin and mucous membrane infestation: Erythematic swelling of the hands and feet with subsequent scarlatini, multiform, polymorphic exanthema.
  • Cardiac involvement (myocarditis/coronaritis/neurysm)
  • Meningism
  • Bronchitis
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Anamnesis
  • Clinic
  • Biopsy
  • ECG/Echocardiography
  • Typical signs of vasculitis of medium and large arteries.
  • Koronaraneurysmen (20% der Patienten), Herzinfarkt, Myokarditis
  • If therapy is given, mortality is < 1%.
  • Aspirin 30-60 mg / kg KG
  • Intravenous immunoglobulins 2g/kg bw within the first week of illness or 7-10 days.
  1. Bayers S, Shulman ST, Paller AS. Kawasaki disease: part I. Diagnosis, clinical features, and pathogenesis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013;69; 501 e501-511; quiz 511-502. 
  2. Kawasaki T. Kawasaki disease. Int J Rheum Dis. 2014;17; 597-600. 
  3. Kawasaki T, Naoe S. History of Kawasaki disease. Clin Exp Nephrol. 2014;18; 301-304. 
  4. Seaton KK, Kharbanda A. Evidence based management of Kawasaki disease in the emergency department. Pediatr Emerg Med Pract. 2015;12; 1-20; quiz 21.