Botulism

Last Updated: 2020-08-17

Author(s): -

Infection with Clostridium botulinum that is legally required to report.

  • Transmission
  • Smoked meats, canned foods, honey.
  • C. botulinum secretes toxins, which inhibits the presynaptic release of acetylcholine.
  • Muscle paralysis.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Impaired vision.
  • Medical history (what was eaten).
  • Clinical features.
  • Obligation to report.
  • Hospitalization (CAVE: renal insufficiency).
  • Treatment with a botulism antitoxin (A-G) and/or B. immunoglobulin.

 

  • Note:

A lack of botulinum toxin has become unthinkable in aesthetic medicine today. Wrinkles, torticollis and hyperhidrosis are now treated by the above described mode of action.

  1. Rosow LK , Strober JB. Infant botulism: review and clinical update. Pediatr Neurol 2015;52:487-92.
  2. Chalk CH, Benstead TJ , Keezer M. Medical treatment for botulism. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2014;2:CD008123.
  3. Brown N , Desai S. Infantile botulism: a case report and review. J Emerg Med 2013;45:842-5.
  4. Moreira GM, Cunha CE, Salvarani FM, Goncalves LA, Pires PS, Conceicao FR et al. Production of recombinant botulism antigens: a review of expression systems. Anaerobe 2014;28:130-6.
  5. Webb RP , Smith LA. What next for botulism vaccine development? Expert Rev Vaccines 2013;12:481-92.